Archive for 9 February 2010

Universities paid almost €900 000 to IBEC in four years

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“The seven Irish universities paid IBEC €874,083 between 2005 and 2008. These contributions are in addition to the costs of substantial, well-staffed Human Resources Departments. In addition, it should be noted that the State, through the Labour Relations Commission and the Labour Court, provides a free service for the resolution of disputes between employers and employees …” (more)

[IFUT, 9 February]

New Web Site Lists Free Online Textbooks

Posted in teaching with tags , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“A new Web site, Open Educational Resources Center for California, brings together information on free and open textbooks and course materials in one location. Though the Web site was designed for California’s community-college faculty members, it could be a useful resource for anyone trying to find learning materials in the public domain …” (more)

[Mary Helen Miller, Chronicle of Higher Education, 9 February]

Students at the University of Sussex occupy roof of Bramber House in protest of the cuts

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“150 students at Sussex occupied the roof and conference room of Bramber House yesterday, Monday 8 February, in protest to ‘Stop the Cuts’ at the university. Around 70 stayed to continue their sit-in through the whole night in order to make their voices heard amid the funding controversy. Sussex Police were stationed in around the building for safety measures …” (more, pictures)

[Juliet Conway, Bloggerjc’s Blog, 9 February]

Access to Higher Education: A Few Thoughts

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“… Although the extant system is obviously malfunctioning, university fees do not need to increase to plug the gap in funding. The most practical compromise would be a graduate tax linked to earnings. The poorest of students would not be deterred from attending university, knowing that any post-graduate success linked to their increased employability would be recognised and the investment made in them appropriately recompensed. Fair enough …” (more)

[No Grub Street, 9 February]

On university strategy or: A tale of two plans

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

Strategy is one of those words that gets bandied around a lot and means so many different things to so many different people that I sometimes wonder whether it should be gracefully retired like an old pair of shoes past their prime. Sadly its unlikely to happen and every organization & its constituent units seems obliged to come up with a strategic plan periodically. After all, how could any serious organization not have a plan? …” (more)

[Kevin Denny, Geary Behavioural Economics Blog, 9 February]

Geoghegan-Quinn has unique opportunity for Ireland

Posted in research with tags , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Speaking on the confirming of the new commission by the European Parliament Alan Kelly MEP said: ‘Maire Geoghegan-Quinn has a terrific opportunity to direct European policy with her portfolio and Ireland should benefit from this. As a small open flexible economy, we need to be plugged into European policy on science, research and innovation ….'” (more)

[Alan Kelly MEP, Labour Party, 9 February]

Winning start for WIT in Fitzgibbon’s ‘group of death’

Posted in Life with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

WATERFORD IT 2-16 GALWAY/MAYO IT 1-05: Fielding nine of the side that went down by a single point to eventual champions UCC in last year’s semi-final, a more polished Waterford I.T. side turned on the power in the second-half of this Fitzgibbon Cup tie at wind and rain swept James McGinn Park on Thursday last to dash the hopes of a battling, but outclassed, Galway/Mayo IT side …” (more)

[Phil Fanning, Waterford News and Star, 9 February]

Britain’s forgotten EU students

Posted in Fees and access with tags , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Recently, I’ve been teaching journalism at a British university. It’s a popular course already turning students away. But now, with the requirement for universities to trim their sails and cut student numbers coinciding with a hike in applications, it is likely to be turning down an even larger number. This will add to the hordes of disappointed students we have been hearing so much about in the press recently …” (more)

[Ros Coward, Guardian, 9 February]

Agreement reached after students demonstrate to receive results

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“The students awaiting their Christmas exam results at WIT can expect to have them within a month now lecturers and management have reached an agreement. Over 3,000 Waterford students demonstrated on the campuses of Waterford Institute of Technology last week, to demand the release of their overdue exam results …” (more)

[Deirdre Dalton, Waterford News and Star, 9 February]

Working Within a Group

Posted in teaching with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Several things become very obvious when working within a group. On one hand, there are things you expected along with things you did not. Things you thought you knew quickly become things you don’t know. On the other hand you can find a subject you like and become quite good at it …” (more)

[Barry Doyle, Inside View, 9 February]

TCD Launches Trinity Alumni Career Network to Help Unemployed Graduates in Challenging Economic Times

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Trinity College Dublin launched the Trinity Alumni Career Network today (February 9th), an initiative aimed to assist its unemployed graduates during the current challenging economic climate. The Trinity Alumni Career Network, a six-week programme of panel discussions, workshops, career advice and networking opportunities for its graduates, was opened by the TCD Provost, Dr John Hegarty with guest speakers, Central Bank Governor, Professor Patrick Honohan, co-founder of Iona Technologies, Dr Chris Horn and Dr Gerard Walker Senior Policy Advisor, Forfás speaking at the inaugural event titled Ireland: Future Opportunities …” (more)

[Irish Press Releases, 9 February]

Closure of Expertise Ireland portal

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“’The official expertise portal of the third level institutions on the island of Ireland’, expertiseireland.com is to be closed effective 29 February 2010. Ned Costello, CEO of the Irish Universities Association has just circulated the following …” (more)

[Garret McMahon, Dark Repository, 9 February]

Sociologists Get Religion

Posted in research with tags , , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“When Darren Sherkat published a paper in a major sociology journal in the 1990s, focused on Max Weber’s The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, he said that the reaction from many senior scholars was ‘dismissive’. He remembers one telling him ‘this is garbage’ for citing Weber’s views on the significance of religious values. ‘It can’t be religion’ driving human behavior, the scholar told the then un-tenured Sherkat. ‘It’s got to be something else that caused the religion’ …” (more)

[Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed, 9 February]

And the Academy Award Goes to … a Computer Scientist

Posted in research with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Paul E Debevec may be the only research professor whose laboratory subjects have included Charlize Theron and Will Smith. The University of Southern California computer scientist is about to take another unlikely step – from academe to the Academy Awards, for special effects. His pixel wizardry has been featured in films such as Spider-Man 2 and Avatar …” (more)

[Marc Parry, Chronicle of Higher Education, 7 February]

Unofficial university promos

Posted in Life with tags , , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Contrasting unofficial university promo videos. Certainly at least one of these is not endorsed by its University …” (more)

[Registrarism, 9 February]

Writing off the UK’s last palaeographer

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Dry, dusty and shortly to be dead. Palaeographers are used to making sense of fragments of ancient manuscripts, but King’s College London couldn’t have been plainer when it announced recently that it was to close the UK’s only chair of palaeography. From September, the current holder of the chair, Professor David Ganz, will be out of a job, and the subject will no longer exist as a separate academic discipline in British universities. Its survival will now depend entirely on the whim of classicists and medievalists studying in other fields …” (more)

[John Crace, Guardian, 9 February]

First Scottish ‘terrorist’ has conviction quashed

Posted in Legal issues with tags , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“A Scottish student dubbed a ‘wannabe suicide bomber’ has been freed today after appeal court judges quashed his conviction. Mohammed Atif Siddique, from Alva, Clackmannanshire, was jailed for eight years in October 2007 after being convicted of a series of terror offences …” (more)

[Times, 9 February]

Invest in education and RD – Barrett

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Ireland is distinctly average, and average is no longer good enough, according to former Intel chairman Craig Barrett. The man credited with bringing Intel to Ireland over 20 years ago was addressing the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin last night …” (more)

[Dominic Coyle, Irish Times, 9 February]

50pc jump in number applying to attend UK colleges

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“The number of Irish students applying for university places in Britain and Northern Ireland has rocketed by 50pc this year. It comes on top of record numbers looking for places in colleges at home …” (more)

[John Walshe, Independent, 9 February]

What next for Ireland? – Education and research

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , , on 9 February 2010 by Steve

“Last September, at the ‘Global Economic Forum’ held in Farmleigh, former Intel chief executive and chairman Craig Barrett created something of a stir when he suggested that Ireland was under-performing in both education and research and development, and that these failings needed to be corrected if the country was to pull itself out of recession …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 9 February]