Archive for 23 June 2010

Dublin e-learning delivers

Posted in teaching with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“This is my third time attending e-learning week in the Dublin Institute of Technology. I go to learn new things from people like Kevin O’Rourke, Morag Munro, Mike Brady, Brian Mulligan, Niall Watts, Jen Harvey and Eamon Costello. Rebadged as a collaboration between third level institutes in Dublin, the 2010 event facilitates truly excellent talks and workshops …” (more)

[Bernie Goldbach, Inside View, 23 June]

Stanford professor to explain how Ireland can become innovation nation

Posted in research with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“Professor Woody Powell, a leading economic sociologist at Stanford University, California, believes Ireland can excel at innovation by utilising collaborative networks and developing high-tech clusters …” (more)

[Deirdre Nolan, Silicon Republic, 23 June]

SEC says students not disadvantaged by Accounting blunders

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“The State Examination Commission (SEC) has said that students were not disadvantaged by a major flaw in the Leaving Cert. Accounting paper and that the errors were typical of exam systems that generally fail in their pursuit of being error free …” (more)

[Cork Student News, 23 June]

In Law Schools, Grades Go Up, Just Like That

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“One day next month every student at Loyola Law School Los Angeles will awake to a higher grade point average. But it’s not because they are all working harder. The school is retroactively inflating its grades, tacking on 0.333 to every grade recorded …” (more)

[HT: Declan Jordan]
[Catherine Rampell, New York Times, 21 June]

School of Hock

Posted in Life with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“A new kind of testing is coming to university campuses across the country. In the last month or so, Berkeley and Stanford each announced that their students would be offered the opportunity to have their DNA analyzed from saliva samples …” (more)

[Misha Angrist, Slate, 23 June]

Budget: Education spending faces 25% cut

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“Education spending in England could be cut by as much as 25% over the next four years, the Chancellor has said. But George Osborne said in his Budget statement that he recognised the ‘particular pressures’ on the education system. Teachers and lecturers also face a two-year pay freeze from 2011 …” (more)

[Hannah Richardson, BBC News, 23 June]

We Must Stop the Avalanche of Low-Quality Research

Posted in research with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“Everybody agrees that scientific research is indispensable to the nation’s health, prosperity, and security. In the many discussions of the value of research, however, one rarely hears any mention of how much publication of the results is best …” (more)

[Mark Bauerlein and others, Chronicle of Higher Education, 13 June]

Report says surgeons today would fail aptitude tests for college

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“A number of the State’s consultant surgeons would be unlikely to get into medical school today if they had to sit the recently introduced aptitude test for medical school entry, a study has found …” (more)

[Eithne Donnellan, Irish Times, 23 June]

The private option?

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“Recently I got a letter accusing me of arguing for the ‘privatisation’ of Irish higher education. Well, I have also received letters suggesting that ‘you have hidden your shady Hungarian past’ (seriously, I got that in a letter – I was rather sorry it was untrue, it made me sound much more interesting) …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 23 June]

New issues but ESRI endures five decades on

Posted in research with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“Tomorrow is the 50th anniversary of the foundation of the Economic and Social Research Institute. The ESRI was one of five institutes founded with Seán Lemass’s blessing around the time of the publication of Economic Development …” (more)

[Frances Ruane, Irish Times, 23 June]

Private universities ‘to expand’ to fill places gap

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“A university leader is forecasting an expansion in private universities, as students face a shortage of places. This could include overseas universities opening campuses in the UK or offering online degree courses …” (more)

[Sean Coughlan, BBC News, 22 June]

Europe’s Version of MIT Takes Shape, but Not as Once Conceived

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“The European Institute of Innovation and Technology, conceived as Europe’s version of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is slowly beginning to take shape, although with little resemblance to the flagship institution that was first envisioned …” (more)

[Aisha Labi, Chronicle of Higher Education, 22 June]

New StratusLab project wins €2.3m in funding

Posted in research with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“Trinity College Dublin (TCD) has collaborated with five European partners to secure funding from the European Framework Programme 7 to develop a new internet-based software project called StratusLab, which aims to enhance distributed computing infrastructures that allow research and higher-education institutes from around the world to pool computing resources …” (more)

[Silicon Republic, 22 June]

Higher Education Academy – Annual conference

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“Day 1 at the de Havilland campus of the University of Hertfordshire. The opening keynote was delivered by the VC of Hull, Calie Pretorius, and in keeping with the standard set of talks new VCs seem to be provided with in their leadership training his theme was ‘innovate or die’ …” (more)

[Summa cum laude, 22 June]

The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar

Posted in research with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“When it became useful in educational circles in the United States to group various university disciplines under the name ‘The Humanities’, it seems to have been tacitly decided that philosophy and history would be cast as the core of this grouping, and that other forms of learning – the study of languages, literatures, religion, and the arts – would be relegated to subordinate positions …” (more)

[Helen Vendler, Liberal Education, Winter 2010]

Lecturers face checks on the amount of time spent teaching

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 23 June 2010 by Steve

“University academics will no longer be able to get away with doing a few hours teaching and little or no research or other work. The Irish Independent has learned that a forthcoming report will recommend the introduction of sophisticated work-load management models to monitor what staff actually do in terms of teaching duties, administration, counselling students and research …” (more)

[John Walshe, Independent, 22 June]