Archive for 6 December 2010

Student protests: Turner prize awards day sees Tate Britain invaded

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“Dozens of demonstrators made their way into Tate Britain on the north of the Thames in the run-up to awards ceremony …” (more)

[Owen Bowcott and others, Guardian, 6 December]

Student protests: NUS leaders vote not to join forces with march

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“In a resolution that will divide the student movement, the NUS executive decided to go ahead with its own candle-lit vigil on the banks of the Thames …” (more)

[Patrick Kingsley and others, Guardian, 6 December]

Key oral arguments made in stem cell case

Posted in research with tags , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“The attempt by two adult stem cell researchers to quash US funding for human embryonic stem cell research reached a critical juncture this morning, as a high-profile appeals court heard key oral arguments in the case …” (more)

[Meredith Wadman, The Great Beyond, 6 December]

What do we mean by ‘free education’?

Posted in Fees and access with tags , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“FEE is often thought to be just an anti-fees campaign group. However, the fight for genuinely free education is about much more than a defensive struggle over ‘free fees’ (which is largely a semantic issue in any case, given the continuing rise in registration fees) …” (more)

[Free Education for Everyone, 6 December]

JHR claims to have secured third level fees reduction: Radio Kerry

Posted in Fees and access with tags , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“On Radio Kerry this morning Jackie Healy Rae claimed that there will be a reduction in third level fees in the budget for families with 2 or more children in College and that this is a concession that he and Michael Lowry got out of the government …” (discussion thread)

[Politics.ie, 6 December]

Bailey gets honours law degree from UCC

Posted in Legal issues with tags , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“A British journalist who the French want to extradite from Ireland over the Sophie Toscan du Plantier (39) killing was today being awarded an honours law degree from University College Cork …” (more)

[Ralph Riegel, Herald, 6 December]

Not such wicked leaks

Posted in Life with tags , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“The WikiLeaks affair has twofold value. On the one hand, it turns out to be a bogus scandal, a scandal that only appears to be a scandal against the backdrop of the hypocrisy governing relations between the state, the citizenry and the press. On the other hand, it heralds a sea change in international communication – and prefigures a regressive future of ‘crabwise’ progress …” (more)

[Umberto Eco, Libération, 2 December]

Tuition fees news round up, Monday, T-3

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“Another day of irrelevance from our glorious Westminster newshounds in the Lobby. Or rather, some decent reflective pieces emerging like this supremely fair one on Nick Clegg in the Wall Street Journal, but no more substantial news on the state of negotiations. So here is the news …” (more)

[William Cullerne Bown, Exquisite Life, 6 December]

History shows the English state has always meddled with universities

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“In the medieval period there did not exist what we today would refer to as the modern nation state. There was a relative lack of centralised political and administrative control. Hence it was possible, according to Notker Hammerstein, for universities ‘to elude and frequently to avoid … government ordinances’ …” (more)

[The Rambler, 5 December]

The Lib Dems take a pasting

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“For students on their seventh day of a sit-in, undergraduates at University College, London looked pretty fresh when Bagehot paid them a visit this week, during a day of nationwide protests against tuition-fee hikes. It turned out that the occupation was being organised in shifts, so that students could pop out to wash, rest and attend lectures …” (more)

[Economist, 2 December]

Ireland: time to end the ‘employment control’

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“For the past two years a moratorium on recruitment has been operating in the Irish public service. The government made it clear from the outset that this moratorium was also to apply to the universities and institutes of technology, but after some unusually strong resistance from the sector an adapted version was imposed …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 6 December]

Ian Bailey to graduate with law degree today

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“The man at the centre of a French extradition bid following the killing of Sophie Toscan du Plantier 14 years ago will get a law degree from an Irish college today …” (more)

[Independent, 6 December]

While Maynooth march, Belfast will walkout!

Posted in Fees and access with tags , , on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“National Walkout Against Fees,
9 December 2010 …” (more)

[Free Education for Everyone, 6 December]

Closed Monaghan barracks to be education campus

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“The army barracks in Monaghan, which closed last year, is to be turned into a state-of-the art education campus under plans to be unveiled on Friday …” (more)

[Alison Healy, Irish Times, 6 December]

Nick Clegg fails to reach tuition fees agreement with Lib Dem rebels

Posted in Fees and access with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“The Liberal Democrat leader and deputy PM risks seeing his MPs split four ways in vote on university fees …” (more)

[Nicholas Watt, Guardian, 5 December]

The survival of universities

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 6 December 2010 by Steve

“Simon Marginson, a leading Australian academic, began a recent speech at the University of Virginia by describing how the wealthy monasteries of medieval England – supported by religious belief, great wealth and political connections – were completely destroyed by Henry VIII in less than 10 years …” (more)

[Macquarie Vice-Chancellor’s Blog, 6 December]