Archive for dissent

Academic Freedom and Campus Dissent

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , , , , on 12 February 2011 by Steve

Invitation – All Welcome: Academic Freedom and Campus Dissent

As part of our on-going commitment to the project of ‘Enabling Dissent: the Creation of a Civil Society’, The Centre for Public Culture Studies, IADT, the Clinton Institute UCD, and the Dept of Film Studies UCD, are hosting a special event on the 15th of February 2011, at 6.30 pm. We invite you to presentations from our guest panel, followed by discussion and input from the audience:

Panel Speakers:

Chair: Paddy Healy, Former President, Teachers’ Union of Ireland

Professor Stephen Shapiro, University of Warwick: Academic Freedom and Campus Dissent in the UK

Dr. Paula Gilligan, Centre for Public Cultures, IADT: ‘Flexicurity/Insecurity’, New Managerial Cultures and Academic Freedom

Aidan Rowe, Free Education for Everyone, NUIM: Academic Freedom and Campus Dissent – the Student Perspective

This event proposes to ask academics and students to reflect on what role they can have in a society which is shifting to the Right, and what role they can have in ‘speaking truth to power’ in today’s academic institutions?

We invite all students and academics to participate in the discussion, to bring along or email questions, and/or brief discourses on the topic. We also propose to expand the discussions on our website.

Date: Tuesday the 15th of February 2011, William Jefferson Clinton Auditorium, UCD, Belfield. IADT students meet at 5 pm at the IADT gates to get 46a bus.

To book a place: email paula.gilligan@iadt.ie. To email questions for the panel: email paddy.healy@eircom.net.

The value of dissent

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 19 January 2010 by Steve

“… In fact, dissent is at the heart of scholarship. Real learning is about the pursuit of truth, and a reluctance to treat received wisdom as that truth. Truth in turn is most easily discerned, if often through a fair amount of mist, where contrary views have been put and debated and assessed. In that sense, dissent is at the heart of that process, because once we have an established viewpoint with no opposition we lose the benefit of critical inquiry. Furthermore, dissent should have an audible voice …” (more)

[Ferdinand von Prondzynski, University Blog, 19 January]