Archive for Ed Walsh

‘Pampered teachers acting like spoiled children’

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 7 April 2010 by Steve

“As the teachers’ unions hold annual conferences around the country, the founding president of the University of Limerick has launched a blistering attack on teachers describing them as ‘a pampered group’ who are ‘behaving like spoiled children’ …” (more)

[Claire O’Sullivan, Irish Examiner, 7 April]

Putting Clare in University of Limerick title ‘would weaken standing’

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 11 March 2010 by Steve

“The founding president of the University of Limerick, Dr Edward Walsh, has voiced his opposition to a motion to change its name to the University of Limerick and Clare …” (more)

[Anne Sheridan, Limerick Leader, 12 March]

Ed Walsh won’t chair boundary committee

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 30 December 2009 by Steve

“The founding President of the University of Limerick, Dr Ed Walsh, has ruled himself out of the running as a possible candidate to chair the independent committee which will examine the possible extension of the city boundary …” (more)

[David Hurley, Limerick Leader, 30 December]

Limerick leader is true original

Posted in Life with tags , on 10 February 2009 by Steve

“Dr Ed Walsh occupies a unique space in Irish public life. He speaks as an academic, yet has been at loggerheads with the university system for his entire career. He flouts tradition while sporting a waistcoat and using a fountain pen. He loves the cut and thrust of public debate, but privately finds it difficult to deal with opposing views or even small talk. Walsh can make hard work of a cup of coffee, says one colleague. The founding president of the University of Limerick lays claim to many firsts in Irish life. He was the first to introduce large scale philanthropy into education funding here, through his relationship with Chuck Feeney. His was the first university to offer tailor-made graduates to industry; a move credited with kicking off the migration of US software multinationals to Ireland. He brought us the values of the US higher education system; a culture that was strongly resisted at the time, but is ubiquitous now …” (more)

[Irish Times, 10 February]