Archive for grade inflation

A Psychological Cause of Grade Inflation?

Posted in Governance and administration with tags on 8 February 2011 by Steve

“Yesterday, my colleague Matt Pianalto and I were having a brief discussion in the hallway about grading. Something I’ve wondered about in the past, and which we discussed, is whether a particular psychological cause sometimes contributes to grade inflation …” (more)

[Mike Austin, In Socrates’ Wake, 8 February]

University grade inflation

Posted in teaching with tags on 7 January 2011 by Steve

“… Now in one sense this doesn’t matter. Having a degree shows that you have read and understood a lot of complex material and produce sensible conclusions from it, and acquired a range of discipline appropriate skills, some of less use than others – in my case the stand out for long term uselessness was being able to hold a rat with one hand while colour coding its tail with the other …” (more)

[Thoughts of a knowledge geek, 7 January]

What Do Grades Really Mean?

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 2 January 2011 by Steve

“The Christmas Day edition of the New York Times carried an interesting article entitled ‘A Quest to Explain What Grades Really Mean’. The motivation for the article was based around concerns relating to grade inflation, a topic which has been discussed before on this blog …” (more)

[Martin Ryan, Geary Behavioural Economics Blog, 2 January]

Grade inflation: Academia has lost its integrity

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 2 January 2011 by Steve

“Academic inflation is as dangerous to any country as its financial equivalent. When university degrees no longer represent a genuine assessment of a graduate’s abilities, the whole intellectual currency is debased …” (more)

[Sunday Telegraph, 2 January]

Dumbing down of university grades revealed

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 2 January 2011 by Steve

“The full extent to which British universities have inflated degree grades and are awarding far more firsts and upper seconds than in previous decades have been revealed …” (more)

[David Barrett, Sunday Telegraph, 2 January]

Grade inflation is bad, but what’s the option?

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 2 January 2011 by Steve

“Andrew Perrin is right on target in criticizing grade inflation. High grades should be awarded for clearly good work. But here’s the problem with grade inflation criticism. There is legitimate disagreement on the alternative …” (more)

[orgtheory.net, 2 January]

When I graduated, a first was a rare and prized award

Posted in Governance and administration with tags , on 2 January 2011 by Steve

“At my graduation ceremony in 1992 there was only one graduate who was awarded a first in my subject. It made an impression on me because the young woman concerned was rewarded with far greater applause – in volume and duration – plus a few words with the vice-chancellor …” (more)

[David Barrett, Sunday Telegraph, 2 January]